Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci 2021; 25 (8): 3350-3364

DOI: 10.26355/eurrev_202104_25747

Cardiovascular, hematological and neurosensory impact of COVID-19 and variants

J.C. Chachques, L. Mazzini, D. Mitrecic, B. Zavan, M. Rogante, C. Latremouille, F. Rustichelli

Cardiovascular Division, Pompidou Hospital, University of Paris, Paris, France. j.chachques@aphp.fr


OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article was to review our clinical experience with COVID-19 patients observed in the Cardiovascular Division of Pompidou Hospital (University of Paris, France) and the Department of Neurology of the Eastern Piedmont University (Novara, Italy), related to the impact on the cardiovascular, hematological, and neurologic systems and sense organs.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: We sought to characterize cardiovascular, hematological, and neurosensory manifestations in patients with COVID‐19 and variants. Special attention was given to initial signs and symptoms to facilitate early diagnosis and therapy. Indications of ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) for cardiorespiratory support were evaluated.

RESULTS: Preliminary neurosensorial symptoms, such as anosmia and dysgeusia, are useful for diagnosis, patient isolation, and treatment. Early angiohematological acro-ischemic syndrome includes hand and foot cyanosis, Raynaud digital ischemia phenomenon, skin bullae, and dry gangrene. This was associated with neoangiogenesis, vasculitis, and vessel thrombosis related to immune dysregulation, resulting from “cytokine storm syndrome”. The most dangerous complication is disseminated intravascular coagulation, with mortality risks for both children and adults.

CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 is a prothrombotic disease with unique global lethality. A strong inflammatory response to viral infection severely affects cardiovascular and neurological systems, as well as respiratory, immune, and hematological systems. Rapid identification of acro-ischemic syndrome permits the treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation complications. Early sensorial symptoms, such as gustatory and olfactory loss, are useful for COVID-19 diagnosis. New variants of SARS‐CoV‐2 are emerging, principally from United Kingdom, South Africa, and Brazil. These variants seem to spread more easily and quickly, which may lead to more cases of COVID.

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To cite this article

J.C. Chachques, L. Mazzini, D. Mitrecic, B. Zavan, M. Rogante, C. Latremouille, F. Rustichelli
Cardiovascular, hematological and neurosensory impact of COVID-19 and variants

Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci
Year: 2021
Vol. 25 - N. 8
Pages: 3350-3364
DOI: 10.26355/eurrev_202104_25747